Cover for Pagan Portals: Rhiannon - Divine Queen of the Celtic Britons by Jhenah Telyndru

Rhiannon: Divine Queen of the Celtic Britons by Jhenah Telyndru

When I started reading Rhiannon: Divine Queen of the Celtic Britons I knew little of Rhiannon herself. I already thought of her as a goddess, though I couldn’t tell you where or when I learned of her as such, and I thought she was “Welsh”, though more pre-Wales, if that makes sense (I tend to think of deities this way — as deities are almost always older than the nations which claim them). And, for some reason, I thought of her as a Goddess of Light, fair-haired and shining. Honestly, I think the only reason a good portion of folks even know the name Rhiannon is because of Stevie Nicks, a goddess in her own right.

When I started reading Rhiannon: Divine Queen of the Celtic Britons I knew little of Rhiannon herself. I already thought of her as a goddess, though I couldn’t tell you where or when I learned of her as such, and I thought she was “Welsh”, though more pre-Wales, if that makes sense (I tend to think of deities this way — as deities are almost always older than the nations which claim them). And, for some reason, I thought of her as a Goddess of Light, fair-haired and shining. Honestly, I think the only reason a good portion of folks even know the name Rhiannon is because of Stevie Nicks, a goddess in her own right.

I’m a bit embarrassed to say that, after reading this book, I feel like I did not know her at all. For example, I had no idea that she had been accused of (spoilers!) destroying her newborn baby, with blood and bones and all. It might’ve been a tug at my maternal instincts, but I found myself feeling downright devastated for Rhiannon in that moment. Learning that Rhiannon holds no known sacred space or place in history was also a cause for sadness.

Telyndru proves her to be completely and gladly approachable so, I’ve come to ask myself, why not Rhiannon? Why not ask her to halt her white steed and request her assistance in learning more and getting to know her better? The Pagan Portals series of books has proved to be well-researched and informative reads. Jhenah Telyndru’s recent offering to the series, Rhiannon: Divine Queen of the Celtic Britons, is no exception. The amount of information included within this slim book’s 115 pages is quite surprising. I am impressed that such a concise offering includes 5 pages of primary and secondary sources — really! Telyndru has written a clear and welcomed introduction to Rhiannon as an historical figure in literature and as a Divine Queen deserving of reverence and understanding in this modern era. I look forward to getting to know her better.

Review byAnna Chesler Kulcsar


ISBN:

978-1-78535-468-7 (Paperback)

978-1-78535-469-4 (e-book)
 

WyldMoon Reviews are exclusive reviews of titles published under Moon Books, each review is written by a Moon Books author or contributor.